Repower or not?

BAP

Member
Sep 4, 2022
10
2
I am very close to getting "my" new 220 Stalker with an original well maintained Ford fresh water cooled engine. This is my last boat and I want to get the most pleasure out of it in the time I have. I have 2 choices. One is the keep the old engine until it goes or repower now with a new Chev fresh water cooled engine (diesel is out of my budget). How much should it cost for a new fresh water cooled fuel injected Chev 300 hp. to be installed in the boat? If I go this route, should I have it reproped and what kind of cruising speed should I expect? I am not buying the boat for speed, but getting to a fishing spot faster means more time to fish. Please give me some good facts so that I can make a smart choice. I have the money to repower, but am I really gaining anything such as more cruising speed or fuel economy? The old motor appears to run great, but I kind of really want to repower. Please help me decide. Thanks, Bruce
 

CrewTwo

Active Member
Sep 7, 2018
39
5
Hi Bruce, Not sure how old your engine is, but here is what I did with my 2001 246. 2 years ago, my TBI, 1/2 fresh water cooled, 5.7 PCM motor with 1700 hours ran very well. I did a compression check and one cylinder was a little low. I decided to pull the motor and do a complete rebuild. I have owned this boat since new and it was time. Adding up the cost to buy a new long block, new manifolds and various other parts, the cost was climbing over $8,000. I decided to buy a complete, new 5.7 motor from Michigan Motorz. It included full fresh water cooling, fuel injection, and 25 more HP. With shipping, it cost me around $12,000. Using my existing trans and prop, I gained 2-3 knots running at 3200rpm. The boat feels more powerful. I am more than happy. I have since put 200 hours on this new motor. In my opinion, these boats are priceless. The 220 Stalker is my favorite hull. Good luck on your decision.
 

pilarboat

Well-Known Member
Apr 19, 2016
335
36
I am very close to getting "my" new 220 Stalker with an original well maintained Ford fresh water cooled engine. This is my last boat and I want to get the most pleasure out of it in the time I have. I have 2 choices. One is the keep the old engine until it goes or repower now with a new Chev fresh water cooled engine (diesel is out of my budget). How much should it cost for a new fresh water cooled fuel injected Chev 300 hp. to be installed in the boat? If I go this route, should I have it reproped and what kind of cruising speed should I expect? I am not buying the boat for speed, but getting to a fishing spot faster means more time to fish. Please give me some good facts so that I can make a smart choice. I have the money to repower, but am I really gaining anything such as more cruising speed or fuel economy? The old motor appears to run great, but I kind of really want to repower. Please help me decide. Thanks, Bruce
Curious about the cost quoted to you for the reposer.? I'm trying to type re-power, it keeps changing to reposer.
 

CrewTwo

Active Member
Sep 7, 2018
39
5
The cost was for the motor only. I had a friend with a large forklift to pull the old engine and drop the new one in. While the old motor was out, I cleaned and painted the bilge and painted the trans. I did the rest of the installation. Don’t know what a yard would have charged me.
 

Mistress

Moderator
Staff member
Supporting Captain
Jan 22, 2005
7,475
237
San Jose, CA
Personally, I'd fish it as is if it's running good and things look kosher.

You'd have to be going a long ways to make up much fishing time. Then consider if sea conditions will even permit more speed.

To have a yard R&R, I'm gonna WAG 2X the cost of the new motor. Much depends. So you're into the $20+k range.
 

crhodes

Well-Known Member
Supporting Captain
Aug 26, 2003
2,735
93
Southport, NC
Did not see a reference to engine hours but "If it ain't broke, don't fix it." (Assuming current engine is reliable.) Doing so will allow verification you like the boat enough to but significant money in it if ever needed. My 2 cents worth...
 

Fish Witch

Well-Known Member
Apr 1, 2008
1,121
132
Anchorage and Seward, Alaska
You mentioned this is your last boat. I'm on my last boat too after retiring a few years back. I've always done my own work on my boat and when I had a job, I considered the time spent working on my boat as therapy from my day job. After retirement and as I grow older, I look at the mechanical and other work a bit differently, less pleasure and less able, unfortunately, as I get older to do the work and while I've rebuilt several engines when younger, that prospect no longer is one I'd entertain. So, reliability of a new motor may be something to consider in your decision, especially if you're still able to get it done now before old age sets in cutting your boating time left short.
 

fisherlady2

Well-Known Member
Oct 5, 2016
961
162
Punxsutawney Pennsylvania
Consider this... get the new engine, along with accessories such as manifolds and risers now. Keep them in storage until your current motor needs any major work and plan to swap out then. I would expect manifolds and risers are going to be the first to go. At that point you can pull the engine, swap in the new one and sell the old one for parts or as a working take out.
 

Jersey Drape

Well-Known Member
Jun 26, 2016
106
2
When you pulled the motor, did you unbolt the lags? Or the top of the mount? And did you have any issues putting the new motor in?
 

Gary S

Well-Known Member
Feb 4, 2010
1,667
165
Algonquin Illinois,Key Largo Florida
I have always pulled the lags. Then you can build a cradle out of 2x6 or 8's or use the cradle that the new engine comes on and then set the engine down on that rather than on it's pan. A good Ford pan is very hard to find.



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