My boat sank!

Ron p Levin

Member
Mar 3, 2018
13
2
Bellingham, Washington
A few years back I replaced gas tanks. After I pulled them out I noticed rot in the stringers. Alarmed I asked the tank guy about and he had experience because he used to work for Shamrock. So, as I recall, he said the wood was not considered structural and it was more of a filler or form that was covered in fiberglass and that was where the strength was. The u shape of the fiberglass. I still added some resin and stuff and re installed the new tanks. My thought is that whatever you do will be fine.
 

pilarboat

Well-Known Member
Apr 19, 2016
370
37
Ron: I sort of sped-read your comments and kept seeing the word filling, filler, etc. Those words to me causes me to for-see problems. Without going into specifics for your problems with rotting wood, etc., I will say that that wood needs to be completely removed and replaced with kiln-dried pressure treated wood, (kiln-dried wood, nothing else), no filling with whatever material that I see posted on the internet. In other words, start over at the beginning and replace an entire stringer. Properly made stringers are made with a solid piece of wood with no joint because before it's over, the joints will leak and rot; that's why they were originally made with one piece of wood. No fillers, no fitting, rip it all out and replace it. I will not deny that stringers can be made with laminated kiln dried pressure treated wood that is properly encased in an epoxy/vinyl ester/ etc., resin. Kiln dried treated wood is used because it is not wet and resin will stick to it. I stand ready for correction on any of this post; I do not know everything.
 

Mistress

Moderator
Staff member
Supporting Captain
Jan 22, 2005
7,530
245
San Jose, CA
TMK, the Shamrock motor mounting beds are not part of the stringer, but rather a built up boss sistered to the stringer.

I believe several folks have cut of the cap and installed new engine "mounting blocks" successfully.

I'll see if I can find an associated thread. Bad Apple did similar somewhat recently and posted photos of what's under the FRP skin.

It really depends how far the rot goes. If you can get to good wood without compromising any cross sections, these can be "patched".

Edit:

 
Last edited:

Dakota Smoll

Member
Feb 5, 2021
10
1
Thisni
TMK, the Shamrock motor mounting beds are not part of the stringer, but rather a built up boss sistered to the stringer.

I believe several folks have cut of the cap and installed new engine "mounting blocks" successfully.

I'll see if I can find an associated thread. Bad Apple did similar somewhat recently and posted photos of what's under the FRP skin.

It really depends how far the rot goes. If you can get to good wood without compromising any cross sections, these can be "patched".

Edit:

This is what I’ve found. I cut the caps off and found much rotting wood. I’d love to have someone do this work for me but here in port Townsend Washington it is apparently very difficult to get someone to do the work —2months out. I cut down to good wood and will probably fill back from there. Likely a mahogany fill block with epoxy…gflex maybe? Rears are not bad but the forwards are pretty much gone.

I’m sort of in a between area of “do it right” and “just get it done”. I agree cutting them completely out, using pressure treated and fiberglassing it all back together is the best way, but with the engine on the way I don’t really have time to build brand new mounts. I think the repair I make will be substantial. If I’m 5 years I have to redo them, so be it. It takes only a couple hours to get the engine out of the boat, and in 5 years it might be time to pull it anyway.
 

Dakota Smoll

Member
Feb 5, 2021
10
1
587DA360-124A-48D3-8CBA-9A503E93AFD7.jpeg

728EC4F7-E960-4388-9B0E-16F7FD86FB51.jpeg
 

Ship

Well-Known Member
Supporting Captain
Dec 15, 2008
12,114
329
Atlantic City, NJ area
Oak is what it think mine were. If not, oak is still a good engine bed material. And you can usually get it in larger dememtions (6/4 or 8/4) that way less glueing to get the proper thickness.
 

Dakota Smoll

Member
Feb 5, 2021
10
1
Oak is what it think mine were. If not, oak is still a good engine bed material. And you can usually get it in larger dememtions (6/4 or 8/4) that way less glueing to get the proper thickness.
Yes white oak is a possible too. Depends what it costs at our local sawmill. Fortunately because Port Townsend is a Mecca of wooden boats, edensaw is able to produce whatever wood I need…for a fiberglass boat haha
 

Damon

Well-Known Member
Supporting Captain
Jan 26, 2003
3,260
101
San Diego, CA
There is a good chance they’ll total the boat. We are still sort of in limbo on that. The marina insurance is paying out and our insurance will cover the remainder, worst case.

We considered shopping around for something else but when it comes down to it, this boat is just made perfectly for what we do!
I regret selling my 26' Commercial Pilothouse back in 2005.
 

deputyrpa

Well-Known Member
Supporting Captain
Aug 28, 2010
1,199
85
Fort Ann, NY
These were what mine looked like. It wasn't an isolated incident.
KIMG1148.JPG
KIMG1150.JPG

So I just copied and replaced them. It took a few days, but I know the mounts can take the torque..
KIMG1156.JPG

KIMG1184.JPG

.
KIMG1207.JPG
 

Gary S

Well-Known Member
Feb 4, 2010
1,706
167
Algonquin Illinois
Do not use treated wood- resin does not adhere well. Douglas fir is a common used wood probably what was originally used. Pretreat the wood with CPES-https://www.rotdoctor.com/products/cpes.html until it wont take anymore,it is compatible with epoxy resins. US Composites, https://www.uscomposites.com/ has epoxy at more reasonable prices.
 


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