How well do any products take water out of fuel tanks?

Discussion in 'General Conversation' started by MAC, Oct 4, 2021.

  1. MAC

    MAC Well-Known Member

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    How well do any products take water out of fuel tanks?

    Will they take it out 100%?

    What are the best ones?
     
  2. Ship

    Ship Well-Known Member Supporting Captain

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    I have not had good experiences with it but it does prevent excess in small amounts. I almost always had water in my separaters. I gave up and tried to cycle gas through the tanks quickly.
     
  3. ARGO

    ARGO Well-Known Member

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    Only thing that "takes it out" is a pump. Other witch doctor stuff helps the gas absorb small quantities & run it thru.
     
  4. Pequod

    Pequod Well-Known Member

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    They don't.
    I suggest determining how the water got in there.
     
  5. seatux

    seatux Well-Known Member

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    I don't know what kind of fuel filter/water separator you have. I have Racors, at the bottom are valves to drain water that has been separated and collects only at the bottom. The top comes off to expose filter elements, that takes out impurities other than water. Hook up a cheap 12 VDC Carter fuel pump ( can be done with a day/date/timer ) to the tank and use it to circulate the fuel thru your filters and back into the tank
    (thus "Polishing the fuel") and on occasion drain off the accumulated water. It is a win/win.
     
  6. ARGO

    ARGO Well-Known Member

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    When I had a big diesel boat, I bought a big Racor from a truck salvage yard & did just that. Right now I am fighting the "fuel sender misery". Sharing will make me feel better- I out in the new sensor, and ran the bolts in. (Bear in mind I am working thru a 6" hand-hole in the side of the helm deck). 3 tightened, 2 did not. Tried to pull them back out. Uh-oh. Nut-serts inside of the tank broke off on the threads. Now the damn things won't come out! Had to snap off the heads to remove the new sensor. UUF-DA! Now NO threads at all. Here's my fix. The little hole is for a piece of fine wire run out under the gasket so the next poor bastard doesn't drop it in the tank . fix.jpg
     
  7. Mistress

    Mistress Well-Known Member Staff Member Supporting Captain

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    ^^^This

    And anything that can't be absorbed by the doctored (alcohol) fuel will stay in the bottom of the tank. Can accumulate quite a bit before it reaches your pick up.

    At rest you'll have a fuel water interface below your pick up. Under way, you'll potentially have slugs of water going through your system.

    The spin on systems can absorb very little water. The Racor turbines can separate more, but still limited effectiveness and capacity.
     
  8. Ship

    Ship Well-Known Member Supporting Captain

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    My 20 had to be inclined pretty steeply and I would put blocks under one sides wheel then the other. The pick up for my tanks was located at the rear and next to the stringers. I had to empty my tanks a couple times. Once because the marina had water in their tanks. Once because the deck fills had bad "o" rings. And twice because of phase separation (E-10). Lost 2 carbs because the alcohol corroded the fuel bowls and clogged them up. Like I said, I haven't had good luck with E-10 and trying to keep it out.
     
  9. pilarboat

    pilarboat Well-Known Member

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    Most water gets in gas tanks two ways (already mentioned) faulty o-rings at fill cap, and using gas infused with ethanol. Solution is easy, replace o-rings, and never-ever use ethanol based gas as it absorbs water from the atmosphere. In some areas, non-ethanol gas can be difficult to find. I have two inline gas/water separators and never use ethanol gas. During a prior time, I had several carburetor failures (very expensive) and finally quit using ethanol gas. About every 100 hrs, I check the first filter and only find about a teaspoon of water and nothing in the secondary filter. Non ethanol gas is about $1 more in cost; a new carb is $650 (rebuild for $450) plus the inconvenience and danger of a breakdown. If you do not have non-ethanol in your area, get a diesel.
     
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