Fuel Tank Pickup Troubles

Ship

Well-Known Member
Supporting Captain
Dec 15, 2008
12,017
321
Atlantic City, NJ area
Simple question is. Find a company that makes 30 and 40 gallon tanks out of . 250 that aren't custom and specify the size and gallonage for the specs you quoted. That DOES make a difference.
 

seatux

Well-Known Member
Aug 19, 2006
3,066
171
Port Charlotte Florida
Ship, you do realize that is from 1997!
...and you said;

Tux, the heavier/thicker metal has been reported to stress crack. When I did mine I could have done them in .25 inch and stainless but they were reporting the stress cracks back then in aluminum and stainless so I went with speedy tanks because they matched the rds specs.

In Your reference report, the USCG was saying .090 had issues and that the fix was to go to THICKER material, at least .125

So to be clear, your advise was to look for .125" , which is HALF the thickness that is now required by the USCG specs of .25 inch.
 
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Ship

Well-Known Member
Supporting Captain
Dec 15, 2008
12,017
321
Atlantic City, NJ area
.25 is you do larger tanks than 150 gallons. .125 is still the min. For our tanks. And yes thicker is better but not if it flexes a lot. Our tanks fall under a different standard because they are under 65 feet. And are subject to more flex that a larger boat is not. Also the ABYC has additional gov recognized regs which affect small boats. The reg which allows the different thickness is probably found in the ABYC specs which costs money to get access to. Bottom line is .125 is the minimum thickness you want which is what I said at first. .090 is still marketed so .
 

seatux

Well-Known Member
Aug 19, 2006
3,066
171
Port Charlotte Florida
.25 is you do larger tanks than 150 gallons. .125 is still the min. For our tanks. And yes thicker is better but not if it flexes a lot. Our tanks fall under a different standard because they are under 65 feet. And are subject to more flex that a larger boat is not. Also the ABYC has additional gov recognized regs which affect small boats. The reg which allows the different thickness is probably found in the ABYC specs which costs money to get access to. Bottom line is .125 is the minimum thickness you want which is what I said at first. .090 is still marketed so .
Maybe you should actually read the actual USCG tables;
https://www.govinfo.gov/content/pkg/CFR-2011-title46-vol2/pdf/CFR-2011-title46-vol2-sec58-50-10.pdf
 

Ship

Well-Known Member
Supporting Captain
Dec 15, 2008
12,017
321
Atlantic City, NJ area
Here are a few examples of tanks sold that don't comply with that spec. That means you are probably referencing the wrong spec.
Another RDS TANK AD you know, the same manufacturer of most of the original tanks: https://www.tankandbarrel.com/alumi....html?osCsid=b7dc56594132540754f425cc659968c6
And a custom manufacturer:
 

petertr3

Well-Known Member
Supporting Captain
Jul 11, 2017
337
38
RDS used to make .080 aluminum tanks, with a .125 upgrade. I bought a 20 gallon replacement diesel tank from them in 2006 and it was .080. .250 is a big jump, I wonder when that happened.
 

petertr3

Well-Known Member
Supporting Captain
Jul 11, 2017
337
38
My former neighbor owns Weaver Boat Works. They, along with Buddy Davis and F&S use SP tanks. Per SP, their minimum is .125 for aluminum tanks.
I've had my share of pickup issues and ethanol "boogers" clogging everything they can - main filter, pump screen, fuel cell filter. Also, replace your aluminum anti-siphon valves with good high flow bronze ones. You don't want a screen on the pickup, put a Racor between the tank and the pump to catch the crud. My mechanic friend says that a toluene rinse will clean ethanol fouled tanks, and lines but it won't prevent new mischief.
 


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