Conwalk 20 Barn Find

Discussion in 'General Conversation' started by Hadaboat08, Mar 28, 2021.

  1. Hadaboat08

    Hadaboat08 Member

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    Thanks Tommy...SO MANY QUESTIONS! Will send you a PM. OK...I give up...how does one send a private message on this board?
     
  2. Hadaboat08

    Hadaboat08 Member

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  3. Hadaboat08

    Hadaboat08 Member

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    Today I pulled the deck off the port fuel tank. This is what I saw...is this original? The label is difficult to read but I can see that it's an Aluminum Fabricated Products (AFP) tank from Perry FL. Any chance this tank is still good? I'm thinking of having them pressure tested and maybe cleaned. Any thoughts on this?
    20210406_082543.jpg
    20210406_102824.jpg
     
  4. crhodes

    crhodes Well-Known Member Supporting Captain

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    Doesn't look like my original tanks did when first replaced but can't say it wasn't original as you boat is 3 years younger. The fiberglass on the tanks was also on mine but frankly my fiberglass supports were a little more "finished", but again that may be due to different technics 3 years later.

    That said, knowing what I know about tank failures I would pull and inspect because they usually go bad under the foam closer to the bottom, not visible to the naked eye. When pulled you could clean and cold epoxy them if good making them better prepared for the future. Have had two sets of tanks go bad. The first had thru-wall failure at a small area of pitting on one tank and pitting on the second. The second inspection revealed both tanks were down to 1/32' at approximately two spots on each tank (as best I recall). Have seen too many boat fires and people hurt to take chances. My 2 cents worth.
     
  5. Hadaboat08

    Hadaboat08 Member

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    Thanks for your 2 cents crhodes! That blob on top of the tank was expanding foam...it lifted right off in one piece...same stuff is around the sides of the tank...in fact, I'm not sure what is securing the tank. It almost looks like it will lift right out. When you replaced your tanks, were they mechanically secured somehow? Where did you get your replacement tanks? Seems like if I go through the trouble of removing the tanks to test and inspect them, I might as well just replace them. They are clearly old tanks, I borescoped the tanks and they are dirty inside. See photo...
    IMG_0065.JPG
     
  6. crhodes

    crhodes Well-Known Member Supporting Captain

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    I have purchased two sets of tanks (4 total) from Richard Shepard. Richard was with Shamrock in the old days and keeps some parts on hand. IMO he is the go-to guy for tanks. He was responsible for parts/components when with Shamrock. He can be reached at:

    Richard Shepard
    Action Manufacturing & Supply Inc
    Cape Coral, FL 33909
    239-574-3443
    [email protected]

    SO far as bedding the tanks you will find several thoughts. I use styrofoam swimming pool "worms" that children use to float on, cut them to size to hold the tanks into place, then use 4 pound foam at them in the corners to give support. Some use tyvek bags to 1) prevent the foam from cementing the tank to the boat (making it almost impossible to remove) and 2) to wick moisture from around the tank. There are several past threads on this concept. Also, I added small PVC pipe between lumbar holes to allow water to pass around the tank and better drain the compartment. I did not use fiberglass supports as shown in your picture.

    Two recommendations I have are to 1) use some sort of fiberglass mold release compound to prevent fully adhering the epoxy coated tank to the fiberglass (so you can remove the tanks one day) and 2) place nylon line/straps under the tanks so you will have something to lift the tanks with in the future. (Because I had primed my last set of tanks the foam adhered the tanks to the boat and if it were not for the ropes I would have been screwed - took days to get one tank out.)
     
  7. Hadaboat08

    Hadaboat08 Member

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    Thanks for the response crhodes. I came across Richard Shepard's name on a different thread and contacted him a couple of days ago. He was very helpful and generous with his time. Richard suggested that I first pressure test my tanks in-situ to see if they'll hold 2psi for a period of time (I'm thinking 1 hr.). The boat sat on a trailer for possibly 18 years...not sure there was really much exposure to salt water to damage the tanks in that time. I plan to test them in the next couple of days (just waiting on a plug I ordered). I'm curious, did you replace the plywood coring in the hatches before re-installing them? Did you caulk them in before securing with screws? If so, what did you use? 4200?
     
  8. crhodes

    crhodes Well-Known Member Supporting Captain

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    Fortunately have not had to replace the plywood coring. They are still solid. Mine were originally caulked after the deck hatches were replaced and is the way I would do it again if caulking. The purpose is to prevent water from entering the tank area, not to adhere the hatch to the deck. (Suggest a caulk that doesn't strongly adhere. IMO 5200 would be a poor choice.) I did not seal mine as there is no barrier to prevent water from entering the tank area from the fuel hose cut-out. Water runs under the vertical cover into the tank area as there is no elevated "dam" to prevent water from getting in. If you choose to seal the hatch might add a bead of caulk inside the vertical fiberglass cover, around the hose fill cut-out, and run it to the side of the hull. This will act as a small dam.

    This open hole/easy water access is the reason I made sure water in the low-point side next to the shaft had clear drainage by adding the small PVC to run under the foam. When I pulled my tanks saw no evidence of standing water. Hope this helps.
     
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  9. Gary S

    Gary S Well-Known Member

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    I think that even 4200 is overkill. Boatlife used to have a sealant the wasn't so aggressive - you want to be able to get back in to inspect. No need to replace core unless it's soft when you step on it.
     
  10. fishineer

    fishineer Well-Known Member

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    I prefer thin foam-like weather striping with an adhesive side trimmed to fit after cleaning off the old sealant. Makes a pretty good seal and holds up well.
     

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